A United States jury on Wednesday awarded $80m to a man who claimed his use of Bayer AG's glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup caused his cancer, in the latest legal setback for the company facing thousands of similar lawsuits.

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Today's Articles

1) CBD products will soon be available at 1,500 Walgreens stores - The Takeout

2) US jury awards man $80m in Monsanto Roundup cancer case - Aljazeera.com

3) Elon Musk email to Tesla employees tries to explain store closures - Engadget

4) U.S. Supreme Court backs SEC, safeguards investor-protection laws - Reuters

 

CBD products will soon be available at 1,500 Walgreens stores - The Takeout

Article

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a compound found in the cannabis plant.

Unlike THC, CBD does not make a person feel intoxicated.

Proponents say it has therapeutic effects for both physical and mental conditions.

Inching us ever-closer to our mellow future, Walgreens announces today that it will sell “CBD creams, patches and sprays in nearly 1,500 stores in select states,” including Oregon, Colorado, New Mexico, Kentucky, Tennessee, Vermont, South Carolina, Illinois and Indiana, says CNBC.

Walgreens is hot on the heels of CVS, which recently added “CBD-containing topicals, including creams and salves, to stores in eight states.”

Thanks to a farm bill Congress passed last year, CBD derived from hemp is legal, even though “ the FDA says companies still can’t add CBD to food or sell it as a dietary supplement.” However, some companies and establishments are still going ahead with CBD options regardless; for example, Protein Bar & Kitchen in Chicago now offers a CBD oil “boost” for shakes and coffee, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

So while more mainstream edibles might still be a ways off, look for new products, such as CBD-infused pain relief cream, or hemp-enhanced hair conditioner, in the health and beauty aisles next to lip balm and toothpaste.

 

US jury awards man $80m in Monsanto Roundup cancer case - Aljazeera.com

Article

A United States jury on Wednesday awarded $80m to a man who claimed his use of Bayer AG's glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup caused his cancer, in the latest legal setback for the company facing thousands of similar lawsuits.

Agribusiness giant Monsanto, which is owned by Bayer, says studies have established that the active ingredient in its widely used weed killer, glyphosate, is safe.

"This verdict does not change the weight of over four decades of extensive science and the conclusions of regulators worldwide that support the safety of our glyphosate-based herbicides and that they are not carcinogenic," Bayer said.

Jennifer Moore, Hardeman's attorney, said: "The jury sent a message loud and clear that companies should no longer put products on the market for anyone to buy without being truthful."

US Judge Vince Chhabria is overseeing hundreds of Roundup lawsuits and has deemed Hardeman's case and two others "bellwether trials".

Legal experts said verdicts in favour of Hardeman and the other test plaintiffs would give their attorneys a strong bargaining position in any settlement talks for the remaining cases before Chhabria.

The herbicide came under increasing scrutiny after the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is part of the World Health Organization, classified it as a "probable human carcinogen" in 2015

 

Elon Musk email to Tesla employees tries to explain store closures - Engadget

Article

After Tesla's sudden about-face on plans to close stores and go all-in with online car sales , Elon Musk emailed employees to explain the situation.

Electrek obtained copies of the message and Business Insider reported on its contents, which still didn't provide much in the way of exact information about potential closings and layoffs.

– Stores with a high visitation rate and that lead to significant sales will absolutely not be closed down.

It would not make any sense to do so, except in rare cases where the rent is absurdly high.

Moreover, Tesla will continue to open stores throughout the world that meet the above criteria.

– Stores that are in a location with low visitation rates (ie empty most of their opening hours) and lead to low sales will gradually be closed down.

– Stores that are somewhere in the middle will be evaluated over time to see there is some way to allow them to cover their costs.

However, sometimes, in a company with 45,000 people, things happen that make no sense.

It's apparently meant to reassure high-performing sales people and those at well-performing locations, but without concrete metrics they may still feel unsettled.

For now, Tesla has higher prices and a number of retail locations remain open, but any spots that aren't doing consistent business are potentially on the chopping block as it emphasizes more efficient online sales processes.

 

U.S. Supreme Court backs SEC, safeguards investor-protection laws - Reuters

Article

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court safeguarded investor-protection laws on Wednesday in a ruling against a New York investment banker who the Securities and Exchange Commission banned from the industry.

The justices refused to further narrow the scope of who can be held liable for securities fraud, as they upheld on a 6-2 vote a lower court decision siding with the SEC.

The agency took action against Francis Lorenzo after he sent emails seeking investors for a startup company’s debt offering even though its energy-from-waste technology did not work.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit had agreed with the SEC’s findings that Lorenzo was liable in a scheme to defraud investors by sending the emails even though he did not personally write the fraudulent statements contained in the messages.

Writing on behalf of the court, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer said perpetrators of securities fraud could escape liability if the law were interpreted too narrowly.

Fellow conservative Brett Kavanaugh did not participate because he was involved in the case in his prior role as an appeals court judge in Washington.

The appeals court had partly ruled in favor of Lorenzo, saying the SEC’s lifetime ban decision was excessive.

Anti-fraud provisions of U.S. securities laws prohibit false statements and other conduct categorized as acts, devices, practices or schemes.

The SEC in 2015 found that Lorenzo made false statements and participated in a deceptive scheme by sending the emails.

Lorenzo, who had the support of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce business group in the case, argued that the SEC is trying to paint people who might be liable at most for aiding and abetting fraudulent schemes as the primary violators of securities laws.

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